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    Awake Awake Lyrics

    Awake, Awake features both traditional folk songs and re-worked tunes to get your spirit movin'. We include here lyrics to all the songs on the CD.



    Bright Morning Stars are Rising

    Bright morning stars are rising x 3
    Day is a'breaking in my soul

    Oh, where are our dear mothers? x 3
    Day is a'breaking in my soul

    They are down in the valley singing x3
    Day is a'breaking in my soul

    Bright morning stars are rising x 3
    Day is a'breaking in my soul

    Oh where are our dear sisters? x3
    Day is a'breaking in my soul

    They are in the fields a'ploughing x3
    Day is a'breaking in my soul

    Oh where are our dear daughters? x3
    Day is a'breaking in my soul

    They are sowing seeds of gladness x3
    Day is a'breaking in my soul

    Bright morning stars are rising x 3
    Day is a'breaking in my soul

    ---- Note: because of the placement of this tune on the CD, it was shortened and does not include all verses.


    One Morning in May

    One morning, one morning, one morning in May
    I spied a young couple they were making their way;
    One was a maiden so bright and so fair,
    The other was a soldier and a brave volunteer.

    "Good morning, good morning, good morning," says he,
    "and where are you going, my pretty lady?"
    "I'm going out a-walking by the banks of the sea
    to see the waters ride and hear the nightingale sing."

    Well, they had not been standing but a minute or two
    when out of his knapsack a fiddle he drew,
    and the tune that he played made the valleys all ring,
    "Oh hark!" cried the maiden, "Hear the nightingale sing!"

    "Lady, my lady, it's time I got o'er."
    "Oh, no, kind soldier, please play one tune more,
    for I'd rather hear your fiddle at the touch of one string,
    than to see the waters ride and hear the nightingale sing."

    "Soldier, soldier, won't you marry me"
    "Oh, no, my love, that never can be.
    I've a wife down in London and children twice three;
    Two wives and the army's too many for me.

    "Well, I'll go back to London and I'll stay there for a year,
    it's often I'll think of you my little dear;
    and if ever I return it will be in the spring,
    to see the waters ride and hear the nightingale sing."


    Awake, Awake

    "Awake, Awake, you drowsy sleeper
    Awake, Awake, it's almost day!
    How can you lie and sleep and slumber
    and your true love going far away?

    "Oh say, my love, go ask your mother,
    if you my bride, my bride shall be
    and if she says no, love, come and tell me,
    it'll be the last time I'll bother thee."

    "Oh I'll not go and ask my mother,
    for she lies on her bed at rest and
    in her hand she holds a letter
    that speaks the most of my distress."

    "Oh say my love, go ask your father,
    if you my bride, my bride shall be
    and if he says no, love, come and tell me,
    it'll be the last time I'll bother thee."

    "Oh I'll not go and ask my father
    for he lies on his bed at rest and
    in his hand he holds a weapon
    to kill the man that I love the best."

    "Oh I'll go down in some lone valley
    and spend my weeks my months my years
    and I'll eat nothing but green willow
    and I'll drink nothing but my tears."

    "Come back come back my own true lover!
    "Come back come back," in grief cried she,
    "and I'll forsake both mother and father
    and I'll cry Love, and pity thee."


    As I Walked Out

    As I walked out one evening late
    to hear the birds sing sweet,
    I sat me down in a lonesome grove
    to see true lovers meet.
    To see true lovers, meet my love,
    and to hear what they had to say,
    To see true lovers meet my love,
    and to hear what they had to say.

    "Come sit you down by me my love,
    come sit you on the green,
    It has been three quarters of a long year
    since together we have been.
    Since together we have been my love,
    since together we have been,
    it has been three quarters of a long year
    since together we have been."

    "I can't sit down, I won't sit down,
    for I've not a moment's time;
    and more than that you've another true love
    and your heart's no longer mine.
    Your heart's no longer mine, my love,
    your heart's no longer mine.
    And more than that you've another true love
    and your heart's no longer mine."


    Black is the Color of My True Love's Hair

    Black is the color of my true love's hair
    His face is like some rosy'd fair
    With the prettiest face and the neatest hands
    I love the ground whereon he stands.

    I love my love and well he knows
    I love the ground whereon he goes.
    If you no more on earth I see
    I can't serve you as you have me

    The winter's passed and the leaves are green

    the time is passed that we have seen.
    Still I hope the day will come
    When you and I shall be as one.

    I go to the Clyde for to mourn and weep
    but satisfied I never could sleep;
    I'll write for you a few short lines
    and I'd suffer death ten thousand times.

    So fare thee well my own true love.
    The time is passed but I wish you well;
    still I hope the day will come
    when you and I shall be as one.

    I love my love and well he knows
    I love the ground where-on he goes
    If you know more on earth I see
    I can't serve you as you have me.


    The Waggoner's Lad

    "I am a poor girl my fortune is sad,
    I've often been courted by a waggoner's lad;
    He courted me daily, by night and by day
    And now he is leaving and going away."

    "Go put up your horses and feed them some hay;
    Come sit down beside me as long as may."
    "My horses ain't hungry, they won't eat your hay,
    So goodbye little Nancy, I'll be on my way."

    "Your waggon needs greasing, your bill is to pay;
    Come sit down beside me as long as you stay."
    "My waggon is greasy, my whip's in my hand,
    So fare thee well, Nancy, I'll be on my way."

    "Your parents don't like me they say I'm too poor.
    They say I'm not worthy of entering your door.
    I work for my living, my money's my own,
    And if they don't like me then leave me alone."

    So early one morning this poor boy did rise,
    A-crossing deep water with tears in his eyes.
    I'll build me a cabin on a mountain so high,
    Where the bluebirds and the turtle doves can hear my sad cry.


    The Maid of Islington

    There was a youth and a well loved youth, he was a squire's son,
    and he loved the bailiff's daughter fair that lived at Islington.

    But she was coy and never would her heart on him bestow,
    And he is sent to London-town because he loved her so.

    And when he had been seven long years, never his love could see,
    "Oh, the tears I've shed for her who little thought of me."

    Then all the youths of Islington went forth to sport and play,
    all but the bailiff's daughter fair; she quietly stole away.

    She pull'ed off her gown of green, put on ragged attire
    and she is to fair London-town her true love to inquire.

    And as she walked along the road, the weather being hot and dry,
    she sat her down upon a green bank; her love came riding by.

    "Oh pray ye, sweetheart, tell to me, tell whether you know,
    the bailiff's daughter of Islington?"
    "She is dead, sir, long ago."

    "If she be dead, then take my horse, my saddle, my bridle also,
    I will into some far country where no man shall me know."

    "Oh, stay, oh stay, thou goodly youth. She's standing by your side!
    She is here - she is not dead - and ready to be thy bride."


    Fair Annie

    "It's narrow, narrow make your bed and learn to lie alone,
    For I'm goin' o'er the sea, Fair Annie, a fine bride to bring home.

    "With her I'll get both gold and gear; with you I ne'er got none;
    I took you as a waif woman, I'll leave you as the same.

    "But who will bake my bridal bread, who'll brew my bridal ale,
    and who will welcome my fine bride that I bring o'er the lay?"

    "It's I will bake your bridal bread, I'll brew your bridal ale,
    and I will welcome your fine bride, that you bring o'er the lay."

    "But she that welcomes my new bride must go like a maiden fair,
    and she must lace her middle so neat and braid her yellow hair."

    "But how can I gae maiden-like when maiden I am none?
    For I've born seven sons by you and am with child again."

    She took her young son in her arms, another in her hand,
    and she is up to the highest tower to see them come tae land.

    "Come up, come up my eldest son and look o'er yon strand,
    and see your father's new-come bride before she's come to land."

    "Come down, come down, my mother dear, come from the castle wall,
    i fear that if long you stand there, you'll let yourself fall down."

    Then she got down and further down, her love's fine ship to see;
    The top mast, and the main mast, they shone like silver free!

    Then she got down and further down the bride's ship to behold;
    The top mast and the main mast they shone like burning gold!

    She took her seven sons in her hands and O, she did not fail,
    She met lord Thomas and his bride as they came o'er the lay.

    "You're welcome to your house Thomas, you're welcome to your land,
    You're welcome with your lady fair that you lead by the hand.

    "You're welcome to your halls, lady, you're welcome to your bowers,
    you're welcome to your home lady, for all that's here is yours."

    "I Thank thee, Annie, I thank thee Annie, so dearly I thank thee,
    You're the likest to my sister, Annie, that ever I did see.

    "There came a knight from o'er the sea who stole my sister away;
    O shame on him and his company and the land wherever he stay."

    And aye, she served the tables long with white bread and white wine,
    And aye, she drank the wan water, to keep her color fine.

    And aye, she served the tables long with white bread and with brown,
    and aye, she turned her round about so fast the tears fell down.

    When bells were rung and mass was sung and all were bound for bed,
    Lord Thomas and his new-come bride to their chambers they were led.

    She took her harp all in her hands to harp these two to sleep;
    as Annie harped, as Annie sang, full sorely she did weep.


    Pretty Fair Miss

    Set a pretty fair miss all in her garden
    and a handsome young soldier came a riding by
    said, "Could I impose on a fair young maiden
    and ask her for to be my bride?"

    Said, "Handsome soldier standing by the gateway,
    a man of honor you may be.
    But how could you impose on a fair yound maiden
    who never intends your bride to be?"

    Said, "I've got a true love that's gone into the army
    and he's been gone for seven years long.
    But if he stays gone seven years longer
    no man on earth could marry me."

    "Prayhaps your lover's drown in the ocean;
    prayhaps he's on some battle field slain;
    prayhaps he's taken another girl and married,
    his face you'll never see again."

    "Well if he's drown then I hope he's happy,
    or is he's on some battle field slain;
    or if he's taken another girl and married
    why, I'd love the girl that would marry him."

    His fingers being long and slender
    into his pockets they did go.
    Said, "Here's the ring that you once gave me
    before I started for the war."

    She threw her lily white arms around him
    and straight before him she did fall.
    Said, "You're the man that used to court me
    before you started for the war!"

    "Well i've been on the deep sea sailing,
    and I've been sailing for seven years long.
    But if I'd stayed gone seven years longer,
    no woman on earth could've married me."


    Waly, Waly

    A ship came sailing o'er the sea
    as deeply laden as she could be
    my sorrows fill me to the brim
    i care not if I sink or swim

    oh waly waly up yon bank
    and waly waly down yon brae
    and waly by yon river side
    where we lay down my love and i

    oh waly waly love is bonnie
    a little while when it is new
    but love grows auld and waxes cauld
    and wears awa' like morning dew

    down in the mead the other day
    as carelessly I went my way
    and pluckÚd flowers red and blue
    I little thought what love could do

    o wherefore should I busk my head
    and wherefore should I came my hair?
    for my fause love has me forsook
    and says he'll never love me mair

    tis not the frost that freezes fell
    nor blawing snaw's inclemencie
    tis not sic cauld that makes my cry
    but my love's heart grown cauld tae me

    now arthur's seat shall be my bed
    the grey mist shall my covering be'
    saint anton's well shall be my drink
    since my fause love's forsaken me

    oh mart'mas wind when wilt thou blaw
    and shake the green leaves aff the tree?
    oh gentle death when wilt thou come
    and tak' a life that wearies me?


    Got No Sugar Baby, Now

    Got no sugar baby, now
    Got no honey baby, now
    Done all I can do, said all I can say,
    Can't make a living this a-way
    Got no honey baby, now,
    got no honey baby, now

    Done all I can do for to see peace with you
    Can't get along this a-way
    Got now sugar baby, now
    Got now honey baby, now

    Got no use for a red rockin' chair
    Got no sugar baby, now
    Got no honey baby, now

    Laid her in the shade, gave her every dime I made,
    what more could a poor boy do?
    what more could a poor boy do?

    Who'll rock the cradle, who'll sing the song?
    who'll rock the cradle when I'm gone?
    who'll rock the cradle when I'm gone?
    I'll rock the cradle, I'll sing the song,
    I'll rock the cradle when you're gone.
    I'll rock the cradle when you're gone.

    Got no honey baby now
    Got no sugar baby now
    Got no honey baby now.


    Little Margaret

    Little Margaret sittin' in her high hall chair, combing back her long yellow hair,
    saw sweet William and his new-made bride riding up the road so near.

    She threw down her ivory comb, threw back her long yellow hair, said,
    "I'll go down and bid 'im farewell, and I'll never more go there."

    It was late in the night, they were fast asleep
    Little Margaret appeared all dressed in white, standin' at their bed-feet.

    Said, "How do you like your snow-white pillow? How do you like your sheet?
    How do you like that pretty fair maid, layin' in your arms asleep?"

    "Very well do I like my snow-white pillow, well do I like my sheet;
    Much better do I like that pretty fair maid, stands at my my bed-feet."

    He called his servant man to go saddle the dappled roan,
    and he rode to her father's house that night, knocked on the door alone.

    Said, "Is Little Margaret in her room? or is she in the hall?"
    "Little Margaret's layin' in a long black coffin with her face turned toward the wall."

    "Unfold, unfold those snow-white robes, be they ever so fine,
    for I would kiss her cold, cold lips, now I know they'll never kiss mine."

    "Three times he kissed her cold, cold hand, twice he kissed her cheek,
    And once he kissed her cold, cold lips, and then he in her arms asleep."

    Cuckoo

    A-walking, a-walking, a-walking goes I
    To meet my true lover, we'll meet by and by;
    For meeting's a pleasure and parting's a grief,
    An inconstant lover is worse than a thief.

    A thief will but rob you and take all you have,
    An inconstant lover will bring you to the grave;
    The grave will consume you, and turn you to dust,
    There's not one in a thousand a poor girl can trust.

    Come all you pretty fair maids take warning by me,
    Never place your affections on a green growing tree;
    The leaves they will wither, the roots will decay,
    The beauty of a fair one will soon fade away.

    Cuckoo is a pretty bird she sings as she flies,
    She brings us good tidings and tells us no lies;
    She sucks all sweet flowers to keep her voice clear,
    She never cries, "Cuckoo," till spring of the year.


    When Will Ye Gang Awa?

    "When will ye gang awa' Jamie?
    Far across the sea, laddie?
    When ye gang to Germany,
    What will ye bring to me, laddie?"

    "I'll bring a brand new gown, lassie,
    The brawest in the town, Janie.
    It shall be made with silken thread
    With ruffles all around, lassie."

    "That's nae guid at all, Jamie,
    Silken gown and all, laddie.
    There's nae a gift in all the town
    I'll hae when you're awa, laddie."

    "When I come back again, Janie,

    Frae a foreign land, Lassie,
    I'll bring wi' me a galant gay,
    tae be your own guid man, lassie."

    "Be my guid man yourself, Jamie,
    Marry me yourself, Jamie.
    Take me back to Germany
    at hame with ye to dwell, laddie."

    "Canna see how that could be, lassie,
    Canna see how that could be, Janie,
    For I've a wife and bairns three,
    canna see how you'd agree, lassie."

    "Why couldn't ye hae telt me that afore, Jamie?
    Why couldn't ye a telt me long ago, laddie?
    For had I ken all your false heart,
    you ne're hae got in mine, laddie."

    "Dry the tearful 'ee, lassie,
    weep nae mair for me, Janie,
    For I have no wife, nor bairns three,
    I'll wed no one but thee, lassie.

    "All Loch Voil is mine, lassie,
    All Loch Voil is mine, lassie.
    St. Johnston's tower and Hunting Bower,
    they are all mine and thine, lassie." **

    ---- **last verse omitted


    She Mov'd Through the Fair

    My young love said to me, "My mother won't mind,
    and my father won't slight you for your lack of kind."
    Then she stepped away from me and this she did say,
    "It will not be long, love, till our wedding day."

    She stepped away from me and she moved through the fair,
    And fondly I watched her move here and move there;
    then she made her way homeward with one star awake
    like the swan in the evening moves over the lake.

    The people were saying, "No two e're were wed
    only one hath his sorrow that never was said."
    Then she smiled as she passed with her goods and her gear
    and that was the last I saw of my dear.

    Last night she came to me, my dead love came in;
    so softly she came that her feet made no din.
    Then she laid her hand on me and this she did say,
    "It will not be long, love, till our wedding day."


    My Dearest Dear

    My dearest dear the time draws near when you and I must part
    and no one knows the inner grief of my poor aching heart,
    or what I've suffered for your sake, the one I love so dear.
    I wish that I could go with you or you might tarry here.

    I wish't your breast was made of glass and in it I'd behold -
    My name in secret I would write in letters of bright gold.
    My name in secret I would write, believe me when I say,
    "You are the man that I'll love best, unto my dying day."

    And when you're on some distant shore think on your absent friend,
    and when the wind blows high and clear a line to me pray send
    and when the wind blows high and clear pray send it love to me
    that I might know by your handwrite how times has gone with thee.


    Bonnie Barbry-o

    Come down the stairs bonnie Barby-o (x 2)
    Come down the stairs camin' back your yellow hair,
    Bid a fond farewell to your mother-o

    How can I come down, bonnie Willlie-o? (x 2)
    How can I come down when I'm locked here in my room
    and a big deep well beneath me window?

    I'll buy you ribbons, buy you pearls, bonnie Barbry-o (x 2)
    I'll buy you silken gowns and I'll roll you up and down
    when I come in to your presence-o

    Keep your ribbons, keep your pearls, bonnie Willie-o (x 2)
    You can keep your silken gowns, you'll not roll me up and down,
    and you won't get near me chambers-o.

    For what would me mother say, bonnie Willie-o?
    What would me mother say, bonnie Willie-o?
    What would me mother say if I were to walk away
    with you and all your soldiers-o?

    The soldiers never fear, bonnie Barbry-o (x 2)
    For I'll make them all to stand with their caps all in their hands
    when they come into your presence-o

    Come down the stairs bonnie Barby-o (x 2)
    Come down the stairs camin' back your yellow hair,
    Bid a fond farewell to your mother-o


    Poor Wayfaring Stranger

    I am a poor wayfaring stranger
    travelling through this world of woe
    and there's no sickness toil or danger
    in that bright land to where I go

    I'm going there to see my father
    I'm going there no more to roam
    I'm only going over Jordan
    I'm only going over home

    I know dark clouds may gather round me
    I know my way is rough & steep
    but golden hills lay just before me
    where weary eyes no more will weep

    I'm going there to see my mother
    she said she'd meet me when I come
    I'm only going over Jordan
    I'm only going over home

    I want to wear crown of glory
    when I get home to that bright land
    I want to sing salvation's story
    together with that blood washed band

    I'm going there to see my savior
    he said he'd meet me when I come
    I'm only going over Jordan
    I'm only going over home